Fine, Thank You

lonely, taken out of context clippings. significant or simply reminders

"It’s like being wrapped in a chamois blanket and nestled against a big, generous tit, you know?"

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    1. Q: What is more important: a heart or a brain?
    2. Thom: A heart is obviously completely useless unless you are in a country and western song. A brain can stay alive even when you're clinically dead and can be used to useful ends such as operating train signals and reading books. If the power fails, it can be hooked up to a car battery or a transformer. A brain pulsates in dramatic fashion when preserved in a bubbling glass container, and there have been cases of a brain holding complete power over an entire nation.
     
  1. Islands by Muriel Rukeyser

    mythologyofblue:

    O for God’s sake
    they are connected
    underneath

    They look at each other
    across the glittering sea
    some keep a low profile

    Some are cliffs
    The Bathers think
    islands are separate like them

     
  2. "Depression is a good lover. So attentive. Has this innate way of making everything about you."
    — Kait Rokowski, A Good Day” (via larmoyante)
     
  3. Carey Mulligan, why are you so beautiful?

    (Source: isisloveforever)

     
  4. tinatiantian:

“When you’re truly happy, you don’t stop to ask yourself, am I really happy? The same goes with love. It happens when you stop questioning.”
- Professor John Lachs on love, Vanderbilt University

Took his ethics class this semester. What a legend. 

    tinatiantian:

    “When you’re truly happy, you don’t stop to ask yourself, am I really happy? The same goes with love. It happens when you stop questioning.”

    - Professor John Lachs on love, Vanderbilt University

    Took his ethics class this semester. What a legend. 

     
  5. "A poem begins with a lump in the throat."
    — Robert Frost (via hopeinspiresme)
     
  6. nevver:

Joss Whedon
     
  7. beingblog:

Einstein Sleuthing
by Nancy Rosenbaum, associate producer
I stumbled upon a perplexing puzzle as we were fine-tuning our upcoming show with Buddhist teacher and author Matthieu Ricard. Krista had included a quote in the script by Albert Einstein that needed to be fact checked. This seemed pretty straightforward…at first.
Albert Einstein is one of those famous people who gets quoted a lot, sometimes inaccurately. My colleagues at SOF were already familiar with this from producing two companion programs about Einstein back in 2007.
Following is the quote from Einstein as it appears in The Quantum and the Lotus, a book Matthieu Ricard wrote together with astrophysicist Trinh Xuan Thuan:

“A human being is part of a whole, called by us the ‘Universe,’ a part limited in time and space. He experiences himself, his thoughts and feelings, as something separated from the rest—a kind of optical delusion of his consciousness. This delusion is a kind of prison for us, restricting us to our personal desires and to affection for a few persons nearest us. Our task must be to free ourselves from this prison by widening our circles of compassion to embrace all living creatures and the whole of nature in its beauty.”

Plug this quote into Google and you get hits galore, including references to this 1972 New York Times article. But if you look at the typed version at the beginning of this post, you’ll notice some differences — specifically the last two sentences. So where did the quote come from exactly, and in what context did Einstein originally write or say these words?
My search led me to Dear Professor Einstein, a collection of Einstein’s correspondence that features a version of the quote in question, which closely matches the copy we obtained from the Albert Einstein Archives at Hebrew University of Jerusalem.
Through Facebook, I contacted the book’s editor, Alice Calaprice, who explained that Einstein had penned his famous words in 1950 to Robert S. Marcus, a man who was distraught over the death of his young son from polio. Calaprice concurred that people often misquote Einstein — and that primary sources are the key to setting the record straight. “When we don’t have originals to prove otherwise,” wrote Calaprice, “falsehoods are sometimes inadvertently repeated even by scholars.”

To that end, Barbara Wolff, an archivist at the Albert Einstein Archives, sent us the actual image of the handwritten versions of Einstein’s letter in German and English below. I wonder about who translated Einstein’s words and whether some meaning may have gotten lost.
As I’ve resurfaced from all this Einstein sleuthing, I’ve been pondering my responsibility as producer to verify the quote’s accuracy. But, as I look at Einstein’s handwritten letter with its scrawls and cross outs, I’m reminded that language and ideas are not fixed like cement. Still, it’s my job to get it right.
What’s funny is that after all this effort, we debated ditching the quote altogether. Matthieu Ricard is such a rich voice, did we really need to bring Einstein into the conversation? In the end though, we corrected the quote, and kept Einstein, “sounding more than a little bit Buddhist,” as Krista put it, in the final script read.
Special thanks to Barbara Wolff and the Albert Einstein Archives at Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel, which holds copyright for these archival materials.

    beingblog:

    Einstein Sleuthing

    by Nancy Rosenbaum, associate producer

    I stumbled upon a perplexing puzzle as we were fine-tuning our upcoming show with Buddhist teacher and author Matthieu Ricard. Krista had included a quote in the script by Albert Einstein that needed to be fact checked. This seemed pretty straightforward…at first.

    Albert Einstein is one of those famous people who gets quoted a lot, sometimes inaccurately. My colleagues at SOF were already familiar with this from producing two companion programs about Einstein back in 2007.

    Following is the quote from Einstein as it appears in The Quantum and the Lotus, a book Matthieu Ricard wrote together with astrophysicist Trinh Xuan Thuan:

    “A human being is part of a whole, called by us the ‘Universe,’ a part limited in time and space. He experiences himself, his thoughts and feelings, as something separated from the rest—a kind of optical delusion of his consciousness. This delusion is a kind of prison for us, restricting us to our personal desires and to affection for a few persons nearest us. Our task must be to free ourselves from this prison by widening our circles of compassion to embrace all living creatures and the whole of nature in its beauty.”

    Plug this quote into Google and you get hits galore, including references to this 1972 New York Times article. But if you look at the typed version at the beginning of this post, you’ll notice some differences — specifically the last two sentences. So where did the quote come from exactly, and in what context did Einstein originally write or say these words?

    My search led me to Dear Professor Einstein, a collection of Einstein’s correspondence that features a version of the quote in question, which closely matches the copy we obtained from the Albert Einstein Archives at Hebrew University of Jerusalem.

    Through Facebook, I contacted the book’s editor, Alice Calaprice, who explained that Einstein had penned his famous words in 1950 to Robert S. Marcus, a man who was distraught over the death of his young son from polio. Calaprice concurred that people often misquote Einstein — and that primary sources are the key to setting the record straight. “When we don’t have originals to prove otherwise,” wrote Calaprice, “falsehoods are sometimes inadvertently repeated even by scholars.”

    Handwritten Draft of Albert Einstein's Letter to Robert S. Marcus (February 12, 1950)

    To that end, Barbara Wolff, an archivist at the Albert Einstein Archives, sent us the actual image of the handwritten versions of Einstein’s letter in German and English below. I wonder about who translated Einstein’s words and whether some meaning may have gotten lost.

    As I’ve resurfaced from all this Einstein sleuthing, I’ve been pondering my responsibility as producer to verify the quote’s accuracy. But, as I look at Einstein’s handwritten letter with its scrawls and cross outs, I’m reminded that language and ideas are not fixed like cement. Still, it’s my job to get it right.

    What’s funny is that after all this effort, we debated ditching the quote altogether. Matthieu Ricard is such a rich voice, did we really need to bring Einstein into the conversation? In the end though, we corrected the quote, and kept Einstein, “sounding more than a little bit Buddhist,” as Krista put it, in the final script read.

    Special thanks to Barbara Wolff and the Albert Einstein Archives at Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel, which holds copyright for these archival materials.

     
  8. The Universe: Original Motion Picture Soundtrack

    eating-poetry:

    The first track still almost swings. High hat and snare, even
    A few bars of sax the stratosphere will singe-out soon enough.

    Synthesized strings. Then something like cellophane
    Breaking in as if snagged to a shoe. Crinkle and drag. White noise,

    Black noise. What must be voices bob up, then drop, like metal shavings
    In molasses. So much for us. So much for the flags we bored

    Into planets dry as chalk, for the tin cans we filled with fire
    And rode like cowboys into all we tried to tame. Listen:

    The dark we’ve only ever imagined now audible, thrumming,
    Marbled with static like gristly meat. A chorus of engines churns.

    Silence taunts: a dare. Everything that disappears
    Disappears as if returning somewhere.

    By Tracy K. Smith.

     
  9. The Babysitter

    By Sharon Olds

    The baby was about six months old,

    a girl. The length of her life, I had not

    touched anyone. That night, when they went out

    I held the baby along my arm and 

    put her mouth to my cotton shirt.

    I didn’t really know what a person was, I

    wanted someone to suck my breast,

    I ended up in the locked bathroom,

    naked to the waist, holding the baby,

    and all she wanted was my glasses, I held her

    gently, waiting for her to turn,

    like a cherub, and nurse. And she wouldn’t, what she wanted

    was my glasses. Suck me, goddamnit, I thought,

    I wanted to feel the tug of another

    life, I wanted to feel needed, she grabbed for my 

    glasses and smiled. I put on my bra

    and shirt, and tucked her in, and sang to her

    for the last time — clearly it

    was the week for another line of work —

    and turned out the light. Back in the bathroom

    I lay on the floor in the dark, bared

    my chest against the icy tile,

    slipped my hand between my legs and 

    rode, hard, against the hard floor, my nipples holding me up off the glazed

    blue, as if I were flying upside 

    down under the ceiling of the world.